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Support rallies for school levies vote

Coupeville High School art teacher Tacy Bigelow waves signs at the corner of Main Street and Highway 20. She and other teachers were encouraging voters to support two levies that are on the ballot during a Feb. 11 special election.  - Nathan Whalen photo
Coupeville High School art teacher Tacy Bigelow waves signs at the corner of Main Street and Highway 20. She and other teachers were encouraging voters to support two levies that are on the ballot during a Feb. 11 special election.
— image credit: Nathan Whalen photo

Coupeville School District has two proposals on the Feb. 11 ballot.

The first request is for renewal of the maintenance and operations levy, which will bring in $2.24 million each year for four years.

That money accounts for nearly one quarter of the school district’s revenue, according to school district officials.

It helps pay the salaries for teachers, paraeducators, a school nurse, counseling and library services.

It also helps fund student transportation, sports and extracurricular activities and staff training.

The second request, a technology levy, would provide the school district with $300,000 each year for the next four years to allow officials to continue upgrading the district’s computer systems.

Voters first approved the technology levy four years ago. With that levy, school officials have purchased 738 devices over the past four years. Those devices include 313 iMacs, 197 iPads, 192 Chromebooks, displays, LCD projectors and a district-wide phone system that was recently installed. The phone system, which is Internet based, cost approximately $17,000. The dollars also paid for professional development for staff.

“Coupeville is a wonderful community and they’ve been really good supporting the schools in the past,” said Christy Kellison, who is co-chairing the Friends of Coupeville Schools volunteer group with Susan Armstrong.

Both measures have to pass by a 50 percent simple majority.

If the measures are approved, a property owner in Central Whidbey would pay $1.302 per $1,000 assessed property value. A homeowner who has a $250,000 home would pay $325.50 each year.

Ballots went out to voters living within the school district boundaries last week. They have to be postmarked by Feb. 11 in order to be counted.

Ballots can also be dropped off at the Island County Elections office on North Main Street.

Kellison said volunteers have been busy posting signs in people’s yards and visiting community groups.

People will be rallying at the corner of Main Street and State Highway 20 to encourage voters to support the levy.

Levy supporters were seen Jan. 24 and will visit the busy corner Jan. 31 and again on Feb. 7.

 

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